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Bones Double Drabble: Amour Courtois (#81 in ATLBU)
I'm Your Gun - lerdo
only_more_love

Title: Amour Courtois
Characters:
Brennan, Booth
Rating:
PG
Word Count:
200
Timeline:
Set in Season 4.
Spoilers:
For 4x03:  The Man in the Outhouse.
Notes: This is a bit stream-of-consciousness.
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Amour Courtois

He thinks about it sometimes, that kiss he does a slow-motion replay of in his head.

They’re partners. Professionals. Solving crimes is what they do. She and the squints do their squinty bone thing, and he does his FBI thing. Should be clean and simple, right?

But there’s another layer to their partnership now, a layer he never wanted.

“Bones, we’ve got a case,” he says. We kissed; what was that about, anyway?

“I didn't ask you your opinion of Dr. Brennan's character. I asked you, did she have time?” They want to know if she had time to commit murder, but Brennan’s eyes ask a different question: “What are you willing to do for me?”

The answer’s the same as it’s always been. Anything you need me to do. “Yes. She had time.”

He hates them both a little – himself for being so whipped, her for wielding the whip with a smile. Minutes later the hatred fades away in the shadow of her sad gaze, and he reaches for her.

Now she’s dating again. Two jerks. Problem is they’re only jerks because they’re not him.

It’s not her fault. He drew the line; now he’s strangling himself with it.

+++

* Excerpted from Wikipedia:

The term amour courtois ("courtly love") was given its original definition by Gaston Paris in his 1883 article "Études sur les romans de la Table Ronde: Lancelot du Lac, II: Le conte de la charrette", a treatise inspecting Chretien de Troyes's Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart (1177).[citation needed] Paris said amour courtois was an idolization and ennobling discipline. The lover (idolizer) accepts the independence of his mistress and tries to make himself worthy of her by acting bravely and honorably (nobly) and by doing whatever deeds she might desire. Sexual satisfaction, Paris said, may not have been a goal or even end result, but the love was not entirely Platonic either, as it was based on sexual attraction (see section on sexuality below for further views).

 



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I think your "making up stuff" is much more insightful and full of character for Booth than the actual writers of the show. So there.

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